Throw-n-Sow: Tirar y Sembrar, Honduras 2006 by admin

translation services usa
[This report comes from Un Mundo volunteer Rachel McIntire — Admin.]
Throw-n-Sow (Tirar y Sembrar) is the brainchild of art collaborative Shada/Jahn. Throw-n-Sow is a biodegradable flying disc toy similar to a Frisbee that uses the centripetal force generated in the act of throwing to distribute seeds into the environment. Manufactured as a toy made from environmentally friendly biodegradable plastics, Throw-n-Sow consists of a main body and a separate container that slides and locks under the disc. This container contains adjustable holes of different diameter to accommodate variant seed sizes. In other words, Throw-n-Sow is a literally empty container into which individuals and communities emplace selected seeds.
Throw-n-Sow is an interactive eco-art project that engages diverse communities in each step of the project (manufacturing, seed selection, site selection, plant stewardship, art education). Throw-n-Sow raises questions about the expanded field of drawing, indigenous ecologies vs. selective human cultivation, landscape evolution and succession, ethnobotany, agronomy, etc., while aiming to valorize distributive intelligence and interdisciplinary learning as it passes between two or more individuals. Leaving behind a trail of seeds as it sails through the air, Throw-n-Sow essentially imprints moments of play into the landscape.
Throw-n-Sow was introduced to El Pital by longtime Un Mundo volunteer and TnS collaborator Rachel McIntire.  Rachel arrived in Honduras July 3 with a backpack full of disks, fluorescent pink and green handkerchiefs, an array of art supplies and a heavy interdisciplinary curriculum.
The fun began shortly after Rachel was introduced to the new environmental science teacher, Marin Posa. Together, they were able to adjust the project to address local environmental issues and support the school’s goal to construct a portable greenhouse. The school staff has been whirling with new ideas after receiving a grant to expand and rebuild their educational facilities. In addition to the construction of a six-classroom new school, library and cultural center, the school plans to incorporate a greenhouse into their expanded environmental science program.  This expansion would allow students to cultivate a variety of fruits, vegetables and decorative plants and trees, while providing hands-on study of botany and ecology. The project would also generate revenue for the school and increase the availability of plants for families throughout the river valley.
Throw-n-Sow began with discussions on topics related to plant biology and propagation, local ecology and human and plant migration.  The group examined plant life in the area and created a field guide of the existing plant life, including drawings, descriptions and populations.  The entire school worked together to prepare a 20’x20’ “ground” for the throw.  They tilled the soil, diverted the rainwater run off and cleared away all rocks and debris.
After completing the first week of exercises, the group selected a flowering plant to disperse in the prepared field.  In teams of four the groups choreographed a throw, intentionally planning the marks that their interaction would create. Meanwhile, everyone in El Pital under the age of 20 became acquainted with the Frisbee-like disks. Plastic disks soared through the air, reaching high and low as the kids mastered the art of throwing and catching.
After the students mapped and rehearsed the choreography of the disk, it was tossed above the prepared ground.  The group then mapped out their growth projects by recalling the throws of each group and where they imagined the most and least seeds had fallen.  We devised a care plan that included morning and evening watering (if the afternoon rain did not fall) and protection from the chickens and piglets that populate the school grounds.
While the plants were silently germinating below ground we continued our study of plants, experimented with further prototypes of flying disks that disseminated seeds, and prepared to share our work with the rest of the school.  The students decorated the classroom with their work and stenciled logos and bandanas, and each group prepared a presentation.  The themes were choreography and mark-making, plant germination, dissemination of seeds and ideas, future of the project, and the school. At first there was some shyness around presenting, but after practice and encouragement the four volunteers were prepared.
The classroom celebration was a warm success.  After the reception the project binder was completed and passed to the school directors to be saved until the opening of the library.  The field guides the class created will also be part of the community-authored work available in the new library that will open sometime next year.  Rachel gifted the disks to the high school and elementary school with the invitation to practice until next year’s Throw-n-Sow team arrives with new activities and themes of study for the youth of El Pital. The energy of Throw-n-Sow continues to grow as the small sprouts emerge and grow to becoming flowing plants.

[This report comes from Un Mundo volunteer Rachel McIntire — Admin.]
Throw-n-Sow (Tirar y Sembrar) is the brainchild of art collaborative Shada/Jahn. Throw-n-Sow is a biodegradable flying disc toy similar to a Frisbee that uses the centripetal force generated in the act of throwing to distribute seeds into the environment. Manufactured as a toy made from environmentally friendly biodegradable plastics, Throw-n-Sow consists of a main body and a separate container that slides and locks under the disc. This container contains adjustable holes of different diameter to accommodate variant seed sizes. In other words, Throw-n-Sow is a literally empty container into which individuals and communities emplace selected seeds.
Throw-n-Sow is an interactive eco-art project that engages diverse communities in each step of the project (manufacturing, seed selection, site selection, plant stewardship, art education). Throw-n-Sow raises questions about the expanded field of drawing, indigenous ecologies vs. selective human cultivation, landscape evolution and succession, ethnobotany, agronomy, etc., while aiming to valorize distributive intelligence and interdisciplinary learning as it passes between two or more individuals. Leaving behind a trail of seeds as it sails through the air, Throw-n-Sow essentially imprints moments of play into the landscape.

Throw-n-Sow was introduced to El Pital by longtime Un Mundo volunteer and TnS collaborator Rachel McIntire.  Rachel arrived in Honduras July 3 with a backpack full of disks, fluorescent pink and green handkerchiefs, an array of art supplies and a heavy interdisciplinary curriculum.
The fun began shortly after Rachel was introduced to the new environmental science teacher, Marin Posa. Together, they were able to adjust the project to address local environmental issues and support the school’s goal to construct a portable greenhouse. The school staff has been whirling with new ideas after receiving a grant to expand and rebuild their educational facilities. In addition to the construction of a six-classroom new school, library and cultural center, the school plans to incorporate a greenhouse into their expanded environmental science program.  This expansion would allow students to cultivate a variety of fruits, vegetables and decorative plants and trees, while providing hands-on study of botany and ecology. The project would also generate revenue for the school and increase the availability of plants for families throughout the river valley.
Throw-n-Sow began with discussions on topics related to plant biology and propagation, local ecology and human and plant migration.  The group examined plant life in the area and created a field guide of the existing plant life, including drawings, descriptions and populations.  The entire school worked together to prepare a 20’x20’ “ground” for the throw.  They tilled the soil, diverted the rainwater run off and cleared away all rocks and debris.
After completing the first week of exercises, the group selected a flowering plant to disperse in the prepared field.  In teams of four the groups choreographed a throw, intentionally planning the marks that their interaction would create. Meanwhile, everyone in El Pital under the age of 20 became acquainted with the Frisbee-like disks. Plastic disks soared through the air, reaching high and low as the kids mastered the art of throwing and catching.

After the students mapped and rehearsed the choreography of the disk, it was tossed above the prepared ground.  The group then mapped out their growth projects by recalling the throws of each group and where they imagined the most and least seeds had fallen.  We devised a care plan that included morning and evening watering (if the afternoon rain did not fall) and protection from the chickens and piglets that populate the school grounds.
While the plants were silently germinating below ground we continued our study of plants, experimented with further prototypes of flying disks that disseminated seeds, and prepared to share our work with the rest of the school.  The students decorated the classroom with their work and stenciled logos and bandanas, and each group prepared a presentation.  The themes were choreography and mark-making, plant germination, dissemination of seeds and ideas, future of the project, and the school. At first there was some shyness around presenting, but after practice and encouragement the four volunteers were prepared.

The classroom celebration was a warm success.  After the reception the project binder was completed and passed to the school directors to be saved until the opening of the library.  The field guides the class created will also be part of the community-authored work available in the new library that will open sometime next year.  Rachel gifted the disks to the high school and elementary school with the invitation to practice until next year’s Throw-n-Sow team arrives with new activities and themes of study for the youth of El Pital. The energy of Throw-n-Sow continues to grow as the small sprouts emerge and grow to becoming flowing plants.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*